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The JPL Trail After the Station Fire

Sep 10, 2009
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Our friend Bruce Moision — JPL engineer, dad, jogger, Bungalow Heaven resident and bicycle commuter — rode his bike up the usually busy Gabrielino Trail yesterday (what some of us call the JPL Trail, because it’s just east of the JPL campus), as far as the Nino picnic area. He followed the big road, on which he usually jogs.

Moision brought his camera and reported back on the damage to one of our hometown’s most beloved and well-used nature areas. Here’s what he found:

The first half-mile or so was spared — it's still green and leafy.

The first half-mile or so was spared — it's still green and leafy.

Moision says the absence of color is the most striking thing; the white stuff on the ground is fire retardant.

Moision says the absence of color is the most striking thing; the white stuff on the ground is fire retardant.

A sad but beautiful photo that brings to mind New England in the late winter, not California in summer.

A sad but beautiful photo that brings to mind New England in the late winter, not California in summer.

The bridge near the Nino picnic area was a fire casualty.

The bridge near the Nino picnic area was a fire casualty.

The hillside above is now bare.

The hillside above is now bare.

The fire uncovered foundations of some old cabins destroyed long ago.

The fire uncovered foundations of some old cabins destroyed long ago.

Our metaphor of hope for the day: Moision discovered that one of his favorite oaks survived.

Our metaphor of hope for the day: Moision discovered that one of his favorite oaks survived.




10 Responses for “The JPL Trail After the Station Fire”

  1. Hi Bruce and Colleen — Thanks very much for posting these photos of one of my favorite trail runs. I re-posted the link on our KPCC Facebook page so others can see. Looks like this is going to take a lot of time, work and money to repair.

  2. Cindy says:

    Wow, thanks so much for sharing. When things start to get organized, if you hear of any volunteer opportunities to help our trails/forest/mountains, please let us know!

  3. Skylar Sutton says:

    That’s eerie. My aunt and I always used to hike those trails when I was little. It’s so nice to see that first picture, still fresh and green. Good to know some of the trail was spared.

  4. Thanks for this post and these pictures. I agree, it does look eerie. So, so sad.

  5. My big oak is dropping acorns all over the patio, as it does every year and this year they’re sticky…I don’t know why. But I’ve been collecting them. Would it be good to take them up the trails, I wonder?

  6. That’s a great question. Our intrepid reporter Daniel Seigal is talking to the local Sierra Club to get information about the status of the trails; I’ll see if he can get an answer to that question. It would make sense.

  7. Gina Martinez says:

    This is one of my favorite foothill trails, is so sad to see so much damage. I would love to be part of the re-forestation effort. My background is Landscape Architecture, keep me posted on volunteer efforts.

  8. Sam Gendler says:

    KPCC said something about the trail being reopened today, but I can find no mention of it with a quickie google search. Any chance some of you JPL people want to go investigate? (this page happened to come up on one of my searches)

  9. Sam Gendler says:

    I actually rode my bike over there yesterday and it is open. Of course, it was also on fire again, but they seemed to have a handle on that.

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