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Bungalow Heaven 2018

Apr 8, 2018

We find it difficult to get enough of a bungalow fix. We drove up and down the streets of Bungalow Heaven last week wishing, as our head swiveled right and left, right and left, that we’d had the time to walk the streets rather than drive at a crawl. But walk the streets you can at the 29th Annual Bungalow Heaven home tour on April 29.

This year’s theme is “Window to the Past,” featuring the old, leaded glass windows found in many of the bungalows. The single-story homes were “especially suited to a warm climate,” and overhanging eaves and a pariality for windows allowed for cross-ventilation in the days before air conditioning.

The architecture reflected a movement away from ornate Victorian sensibilities to simpler structures in harmony with nature through the use of materials such as river rock and redwood shingles, and by including front porches and wide windows.

Though the primary architectural style is Arts & Crafts, one may see a sampling of Queen Anne, as well as Gothic-, Spanish-, Colonial-, and English-Revival. Besides river rock and redwood shingles, materials used include clapboard, stucco, and brick. The repetition of gabled rooflines is an oft-seen element, too.

 

890 N. Catalina Avenue; photo by Mark Clifford.

 

Bungalow Heaven was Pasadena’s first landmark district and sits between Lake and Hill Avenues (west/east) and Washington and Orange Grove Boulevards (north/south). Hundreds of Craftsman homes were built from 1905 to 1925. The Bungalow Heaven Home Tour is a self-guided tour; stroll along tree-lined streets and stop in at eight homes open for public viewing. Docents on the tour offer their personally unique commentary and are available to answer your questions. Volunteers and artisans provide refreshments, musical accompaniment, and restoration demonstrations. Food trucks are also on site for satiating rumbling tummies.

 

745 N. Michigan Avenue; photo by Mark Clifford.

 

McDonald Park on Mountain Avenue is “home base” where the 45-minute narrated bus tours begin (starting at 10:30 a.m.), as well as a ticketed raffle, a silent auction, and the option to purchase At Home with Bungalow Cookies. It appears that many of the cookies that have been offered to visitors over the years have become rather beloved, to the point that the recipes have been compiled in this self-produced cookbook.

 

 

Sugar Hero writes:

The concept is simple, but the cookies are so much better than the standard chocolate chip and oatmeal you might be imagining! I love the honey-walnut bars, and the apricot-blackberry-cheddar foldovers are like nothing I’ve tasted before. Some of the recipes and ingredients are adventurous, using Chinese five spice, curry, anise, and baker’s ammonia—in other words, these aren’t your grandma’s bake sale cookies!

 

1067 N. Catalina Avenue; photo by Mark Clifford.

 

This tour has become more and more popular, so lines waiting to enter the homes open for viewing can be very long. Start early and wear a hat.

 

29th Annual Bungalow Heaven Home Tour
Sunday, April 29th, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
McDonald Park, 1000 Mountain Ave., Pasadena 91104
Home tour: $25; day of tour tickets, $30 (cash or check only)
Bus Tour: $10; five 45-minute tours beginning at 10:30 a.m.
Purchase tickets at Brown Paper Tickets
For more info, visit BungalowHeaven.org
Or call 1.626.585.2172

 

Learn more about the history of Bungalow Heaven at Planning.org/greatplaces.
Read about Bungalow Heaven’s design and historic preservation standards at CityofPasadena.net/Planning.

All photos by Mark Clifford.

1179 E. Claremont Street, Bungalow Heaven; photo by Mark Clifford.

 

 

 




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