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Production Of The Iconic And Controversial VW Beetle, Already Once-Resurrected, To Halt This Week

Jul 9, 2019

Volkswagen, US officials reach tentative deal

Volkswagen logo; Credit: Brennan Linsley/AP

AirTalk®

Volkswagen is halting production of the last version of its Beetle model this week at its plant in Puebla, Mexico. It’s the end of the road for a vehicle that has symbolized many things over a history spanning eight decades since 1938.

It has been: a part of Germany’s darkest hours as a never-realized Nazi prestige project. A symbol of Germany’s postwar economic renaissance and rising middle-class prosperity. An example of globalization, sold and recognized all over the world. An emblem of the 1960s counterculture in the United States. Above all, the car remains a landmark in design, as recognizable as the Coca-Cola bottle.

The car’s original design — a rounded silhouette with seating for four or five, nearly vertical windshield and the air-cooled engine in the rear — can be traced back to Austrian engineer Ferdinand Porsche, who was hired to fulfill Adolf Hitler’s project for a “people’s car” that would spread auto ownership the way the Ford Model T had in the U.S. Production at Wolfsburg ended in 1978 as newer front drive models like the Golf took over. But the Beetle wasn’t dead yet. Production went on in Mexico from 1967 until 2003 — longer than the car had been made in Germany. Nicknamed the “vochito,” the car made itself at home as a rugged, Mexican-made “carro del pueblo.” The New Beetle — a completely retro version build on a modified Golf platform — resurrected some of the old Beetle’s cute, unconventional aura in 1998 under CEO Ferdinand Piech, Ferdinand Porsche’s grandson. In 2012, the Beetle’s design was made a bit sleeker.

Today on AirTalk, we’ll look back on the controversial history of the VW Beetle and what the end of its production means for Volkswagen. If you own a VW Beetle or have owned one, what are your memories associated with the car? Where do you think its place is in the annals of iconic European cars?

With files from AP.

Guest:

David Welch, Detroit bureau chief for Bloomberg; he tweets @DavidWelchBN

This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.

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