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State of Mulch 2

Nov 23, 2015

Flow_of_Merced_River_after_Autumn's_rain_storm_in_Yosemite_Valley“In consideration of the coming El Niño, which may bring huge amounts of water to us or even in imagining the years of drought we are likely facing in the future, there are no greater actions we can take than to contour the land to capture water and to use mulch to help cleanse, augment and retain the water,” according to Leigh Adams, designer of a demonstration rain-harvesting garden at the L. A. County Arboretum.

With the possibility of heavy rains as a result of the El Niño effect this winter, the drought-ridden soil may not be up to the task of full absorption, resulting in more flooding than normal.

 

Rio Nido, California, 3/3/1998 -- El Nino storms deluge Northern California neighborhoods with the Rio Nido mud slides. Photo by Dave Gatley/FEMA News Photo

Rio Nido, California, 3/3/1998 — El Nino storms deluge Northern California neighborhoods with the Rio Nido mud slides. Photo by Dave Gatley/FEMA News Photo

 

 

Placing chipped tree-wood mulch on soil heavy rain lands on many surfaces, which breaks its velocity and allows the rain to stay and soak in instead of racing off to the ocean. It provides water for our trees long after the rainy day and some reaches the aquifer to be pumped out and purified for the drinking water no longer available to import. (L. A. Arboretum)

The question: “How can we get enough of this versatile mulch to cover all our bare soil?”

Mulch for the People, a project of Transition Pasadena, and Zanja Madre present State of Mulch 2 where ideas are welcome, ideas are discussed, and experts will share their knowledge about mulch.

The experts:
Leigh Adams of the L. A. County Arboretum
Melanie Winter of The River Project and Water L. A.
Greg Jones of Long Beach Public Works
Charles Peretz of Pasadena Public Works

Moderator Sarah Leone of Hollywood Food Guild invites the public to share ideas, too.

 

State of Mulch 2
Tuesday, Dec. 8th, 6:30 p.m. (mingle) & 7:30 p.m. (panel)
Location: The Shed, 1355 Lincoln Ave., Pasadena 91103
Free event
For more info, visit event Facebook page

 

Mulch—woody material that exits the arborist’s shredder—is good for gardens. It slows evaporation and soaks water to avoid runoff, thus conserving water. It cools the soil, allowing worms to congregate and enrich it. It insulates the soil from the sun, discouraging weeds. What gardener wouldn’t like to use quantities of mulch? Apply a thick layer! (Mulch for the People)

 

tree-bark-mulch

 

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Photo, top right, Merced River (2010) by Brocken Inaglory (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Photo, mud slide, by Dave Gatley (This image is from the FEMA Photo Library.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Photo, below, tree bark by Juliane Collins (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons.

 

600px-Tree_Bark

 

 

 

 

 




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