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Iron Jawed Angels

Mar 21, 2016

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In celebration of Women’s History Month, YWCA Pasadena-Foothill Valley will screen Iron Jawed Angels on Thursday, March 24.

This 2004 film stars Hilary Swank and Frances O’Connor as suffragists, feminists, and women’s rights activists Alice Burns and Lucy Burns (respectively), as well as Anjelica Huston as Carrie Chapman Catt and Julia Ormond as Inez Millholland.

 

Hillary Swank as Alice Paul

Hillary Swank as Alice Paul

 

David Butterworth¹ writes, “With Iron Jawed Angels, the cable giant Home Box Office has once again crafted a classy biopic, this time focusing on early 20th Century Women’s Suffrage movement pioneers Alice Paul and Lucy Burns.” Though the music enlisted is contemporary and “fast-tracking camera tricks occasionally detract,” Butterworth praises the dialogue, the A-list talent, the “excellent hats,” and concludes…

…”there’s a lot to appreciate here, especially during some of the more harrowing scenes in the Occoquan Workhouse, where Paul and her fellow suffragists were sentenced to seven months for “blocking traffic” in front of Woodrow Wilson’s White House. (Rec.Art.Movies.Reviews)

 

Frances O'Connor as Lucy Burns

Frances O’Connor as Lucy Burns who was co-founder along with Alice Paul of the National Woman’s Party (NWP)

 

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Anjelica Huston as Carrie Chapman Catt who was the National Woman Suffrage Association president, succeeding Susan B. Anthony (who had co-founded the organization with Elizabeth C. Stanton in 1869)

 

Julia Ormond as Inez Milholland who was a suffragist, labor lawyer, and World War I correspondent

Julia Ormond as Inez Milholland who was a suffragist, labor lawyer, and World War I correspondent

 

In the November 25, 1917 edition of the New York Times, it was reported that “twenty-five militant suffragists” were transferred from the Federal Workhouse of Occoquan as a federal judge determined they had been held illegally while three women were released on parole “because they were so near collapse from what they had undergone at Occoquan that it was feared further confinement would result in their deaths” (NYTimes.com/mem/archives).

 

Lucy Burns in Occoquan Workhouse

Lucy Burns in Occoquan Workhouse

 

Tom Dorsey, media critic for the Courier-Journal from 1976 to 2008, reviewed Iron Jawed Angels at the time of its release in 2004:

This isn’t a nice little story of sweet suffragettes marching down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. Iron Jawed Angels is an account of life in the trenches on the front lines of the war these women carried right to the steps of the White House. (Iron-Jawed-Angels.com)

 

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Screening of Iron Jawed Angels
Thursday, March 24th, 6:30 p.m.; guest speaker @ 8:45 p.m.
Women’s City Club, 160 N. Oakland Ave., Pasadena 91104
Suggested donation: $15
RSVP by emailing JKubel@ywca-pasadena.org

 

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Alice Paul, 1915

Alice Paul, 1915

 

 Inez Milholland leading the parade in Washington D. C., 1913


Inez Milholland leading the parade in Washington D. C., 1913

 

Official program for woman suffrage procession on March 3, 1913

Official program for woman suffrage procession on March 3, 1913

 

~~~

 

¹ Source: Celluloid Friends: Cinematic Quakers, Real and Imagined (1922-2012), Amazon Press, 2015.

Photo of Alice Paul by Harris & Ewing [Public domain or Public domain], from the United State Library of Congress, via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Celebrating ratification of the woman's suffrage amendment, Alice Paul (seated, second from left) sews the 36th star on a banner in August 1920. The banner flew in front of headquarters in Washington of the women's party of which Miss Paul was national chairman. The 36th star represented Tennessee, whose ratification completed the number of states needed to put the amendment into the Constitution. (Associated Press)

Celebrating ratification of the woman’s suffrage amendment, Alice Paul (seated, second from left) sews the 36th star on a banner in August 1920. The banner flew in front of headquarters in Washington of the women’s party of which Miss Paul was national chairman. The 36th star represented Tennessee, whose ratification completed the number of states needed to put the amendment into the Constitution. (Associated Press)

 

Alice Paul raises a toast in celebration

Alice Paul raises a toast, celebrating the ratification of the 19th Amendment

 

 




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