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Taste of Art: Street Foods & Farmers’ Markets

Nov 2, 2015

shadow-boxersAl pastor sopes with refried beans, cabbage, and cotija cheese on a freshly hot, crunchy cornmeal shell—right off the cart. Carrots, radishes, and beets popping with color and long, leafy, feathered “tails. Balsamic vinegar so thick it hardly drips and tastes more appropriate for a bowl of artisanal vanilla bean ice cream than to toss with a bunch of greens.

Street food and farmers’ markets; two of the most popular ways we eat today.

Maite Gomez-Rejón of Art Bites is busy once again this week with “Taste of Art: Street Foods and Farmers’ Markets” at the Huntington on November 7.

After touring, exploring, and discussing the current exhibit “A World of Strangers: Crowds in American Art,” Maite will lead a hands-on cooking workshop, “a seasonal meal inspired by fairs, street foods, and farmers markets.”

Art + food = an exemplary couple.

 

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Crowds. Some people love them, infused with the collective energy, enveloped in the emotion, caught up in the hype—it’s contagious. Others can’t even consider venturing into a crowd, large or small, unless it’s orderly like at a Laker game or politely working one’s way to the lobby doors and one’s seat at the Playhouse. But step into the mass at an outdoor concert or joining the throngs at a protest march or parade? Absolutely not. Even the thought makes one’s breath catch.

 

Weegee, First Murder, c. 1950, gelatin silver print, 10 1/8 × 11 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © International Center of Photography.

Weegee, First Murder, c. 1950, gelatin silver print, 10 1/8 × 11 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © International Center of Photography.

 

A World of Strangers” includes twenty drawings, etchings, woodcuts, lithographs, and photographs.

By rendering people as patterns of dots, murky silhouettes, or river-like currents of cars, these and other artists create a form of abstraction that erases individuality and tames the crowd’s restless energy. (Huntington.org)

Works include the literal such as Weegee’s First Murder, circa 1950, to the abstract of John J. A. Murphey’s Shadow Boxers (1925) and Benton Murdoch Spruance’s Traffic Control (1936). Other artists include Walker Evans, George Bellows, Armin Landeck, and George Luks.

 

 

Benton Murdoch Spruance, Traffic Control, 1936, lithograph on woven paper, 9 × 14 3/8 in. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Purchased with funds provided by Russel I. and Hannah S. Kully. Image courtesy of bentonspruance.com.

Benton Murdoch Spruance, Traffic Control, 1936, lithograph on woven paper, 9 × 14 3/8 in. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Purchased with funds provided by Russel I. and Hannah S. Kully. Image courtesy of bentonspruance.com.

 

 

Taste of Art: Street Foods and Farmers’ Markets
Saturday, Nov. 7th, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
The Huntington, 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino 91108
Cost: $100, non-members; $85, members
Register online here
For more info, visit Huntington.org/events

 

Karl F. Struss, Crowded Pier by Moonlight, Arverne, Long Island, New York, 1910–1912, sepia toned platinum print, 4 1/4 × 3 5/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © 1983 Amon Carter Museum of Art, Fort Worth, Texas.

Karl F. Struss, Crowded Pier by Moonlight, Arverne, Long Island, New York, 1910–1912, sepia toned platinum print, 4 1/4 × 3 5/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. © 1983 Amon Carter Museum of Art, Fort Worth, Texas.

 

 




1 Response for “Taste of Art: Street Foods & Farmers’ Markets”

  1. We just saw “A World of Strangers” today on a visit to the Huntington. It’s a small and very powerful exhibit! Extremely compelling, all of it.

    You can see it for the price of admission even if you’re not going to “Taste of Art: Street Foods & Farmers’ Markets,” though it sounds like a winning combination.

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