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Scenes from a Solar Eclipse

Aug 21, 2017

Sure, maybe some of it has to do with proximity, but we’re awestruck fans of NASA, JPL, and SDO (the Solar Dynamics Observatory).

Their photographs are outstanding, their digital images imagine possibilities, and the videos blow our mind.

After Monday’s solar eclipse, of which Los Angeles County saw a partial one, we looked to NASA, et al., for goodies to share.

This photo  was taken of the eclipse in totality above Madras, Oregon by Aubrey Gemignani of NASA.

 

Image of the Moon transiting across the Sun, taken by SDO in 304 angstrom extreme ultraviolet light on Aug. 21, 2017; photo by NASA/SDO.

 

This composite image shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

 

The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

 

Close up of International Space Station crossing the sun; photo credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky.

 

Aboard the International Space Station, NASA Flight Engineer Randy Bresnik took still images of the eclipse as seen from the unique vantage of the Expedition 52 crew. Witnessing the eclipse from orbit with Bresnik were NASA’s Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles. (Source: NASA.gov.)

 

As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles. (Source: NASA.gov)

 

Photo credit: Alaska Airlines.

 

View of eclipse as seen through a solar filter, near the Washington Monument; photo credit: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA.

 

The Bailey’s Beads effect is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani.

 

Image of the Moon transiting across the Sun, taken by SDO in 171 angstrom extreme ultraviolet light on Aug. 21, 2017. Photo credit: NASA/SDO.

 

The wedding ring effect! Photo by NASA; color effects by Jenny Rask.

 

The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun at the point of the maximum of the partial solar eclipse near Banner, Wyoming on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky.

 

Via twitter: Andy Field‏ @AndyVoiceover—
The @82ndABNDiv at @FtBraggNC was smart enough to schedule a jump today so they could take this pic. @sean_linnane that’s some awesomeness!

 

A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani.

 

Thank you NASA, JPL & SDO!

 

NASA.gov/2017-total-solar-eclipse

 

Photo credit: NASA.

 

Who else took snaps of the eclipse crescents? We thank Meredith Felton Miller for sharing the image she captured…

 

 

Credit: NASA.

 

 




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