Email

Making Black Los Angeles

Feb 5, 2017

Black-LA_Marne-CampbellDrawing from an extensive database of all African American households between 1850 and 1910, historian Marne L. Campbell will share the stories of middle-class African Americans who lived, worked, and established a community of their own in the growing city of Los Angeles in celebration of Black History Month on February 21 at Pasadena Museum of History.

The first census of the newly formed Los Angeles County in 1850 recorded only twelve Americans of African descent alongside a population of more than 3,500 Anglo Americans. Over the following seventy years, however, the African American founding families of Los Angeles forged a vibrant community within the increasingly segregated and stratified city. She will cite her book, Making Black Los Angeles (UNC Press Books 2016), in demonstrating that the black working class, largely through the efforts of women, fought to secure their own economic and social freedom by forging communal bonds with black elites and other communities of color. Campbell is assistant professor of African American studies at Loyola Marymount University.

 

Making-Blk-Los-Angeles

 

Campbell has written several papers on this and related subjects, which available for download: “African American Women, Wealth Accumulation, and Social Welfare Activism in 19th Century Los Angeles”; ” ‘The Newest Religious Sect Has Started in Los Angeles’ “: “Race, Class, Ethnicity, and the Origins of the Pentecostal Movement, 1906-1913”; “Composing Metropolis: New Approaches to African Urbanization in the Late 20th Century”; and “The NAACP in Film: Three Documentaries from California Newsreel.” Find these papers at LMU.Academia.edu.

 

Marne L. Campbell

Marne L. Campbell

 

My research and teaching interests focus on the middle 19th and early 20th century urban U.S.… My study emphasizes issues of labor, politics, and culture through the intersection of this diverse community with other communities of color. I have completed an extensive database of almost all the African American families in Los Angeles (1850-1910).
—Marne L. Campbell, LMU.Academia.edu

From UNC Press:

Black Los Angeles started small. The first census of the newly formed Los Angeles County in 1850 recorded only twelve Americans of African descent alongside a population of more than 3,500 Anglo Americans.… In this book, historian Marne L. Campbell examines the intersections of race, class, and gender to produce a social history of community formation and cultural expression in Los Angeles. …Campbell demonstrates that the black working class, largely through the efforts of women, fought to secure their own economic and social freedom by forging communal bonds with black elites and other communities of color. This women-led, black working-class agency and cross-racial community building, Campbell argues, was markedly more successful in Los Angeles than in any other region in the country.

Pasadena Museum of History invites the public to a free lecture by historian Marne L. Campbell in celebration of Black History Month. The event spotlights Campbell’s new book, Making Black Los Angeles – Class, Gender, and  Community 1850-1917.

 

Making Black Los Angeles
Tuesday, Feb. 21: 6 p.m. for reception and viewing; lecture begins at 6:30 p.m.
Pasadena Museum of History, 470 W. Walnut St., Pasadena 91103
Free event, open to the public
Tel: 1.626.577.1660
RSVPs are required because of limited seating: blacklosangeles.bpt.me
For more details, visit PasadenaHistory.org/event/making-black-los-angeles

 

~~~

 

Photo, top right: Figure 3.5: Jerry and Henrietta and their three children, Jerry Jr., Grace, and Sterling, ca. 1910. Los Angeles Public Library. Security Pacific National Bank Collection; Making Black Los Angeles – Class, Gender, and Community 1850-1917 by Marne L. Campbell (UNC Press Books 2016).

Images found at Books.google.com/books/about/Making_Black_Los_Angeles.

 




Discussion



Fiore

Flintridge Books

Lyd and Mo Photography

Louis Jane Studios

Homage Pasadena

Search