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Utility Box Art 2

Feb 7, 2016

IMG_8986Box art: One of the relatively new ways for a city to promote local artists and create public art, as well as “beautify” something rather bulky and visually prominent—traffic signal utility boxes.

We hope you enjoy our second of two posts about the newly painted signal boxes in South Pasadena.

Read more about the Box Art Project at SoPasArtsCouncil.org.

 

Jacaranda Spring” by Laurie Hendricks. Sponsors: Watson Design Group, Casa del Arte, Mission Tile, and Mission Millwork.

Location: South side of Mission Street at Orange Grove Avenue and Orange Grove Park.

 

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Bonzai Tree” by Mike Saijo. Sponsors: Gary Pia and Mission St. Wealth Planning.

Location: Northwest side on Monterey Road at Fair Oaks Avenue.

 

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Ostrich, Coyote, Parrot” by Yuki Toy. Sponsors: Athens Services and South Pasadena Chamber of Commerce. (The title is a tad misleading; see below the oddest and most incongruous utility box design.)

Location: Southwest corner of Mission Street at Fair Oaks Avenue.

 

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We found the parrots and also a huge pair of rainbow colored soccer goalie gloves.

 

Though he's not a goalie, we're thinking the soccer gloves tie in with British soccer phenom and shorterm L. A. Galaxy player David Beckham

Though he’s not a goalie, we’re thinking the soccer gloves tie in with this image of British soccer phenom and shorterm L. A. Galaxy player David Beckham; atop floats a cowboy hat and peaking out on the right side is the ostrich mentioned in the piece’s title

 

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Rounding out the fourth side of the box is said coyote roaring toward traffic on a motorcycle

Rounding out the fourth side of the box is said coyote roaring toward traffic on a motorcycle

 

From motorcycle-riding coyotes to “Girl Talk” by Lekit Im. Born in Thailand and raised in Los Angeles, she is an illustrator and graphic designer. Sponsors: The Barnard family, Storbox Self-Storage, and the Wine Grotto.

Location: Northeast side of Fair Oaks Avenue at Hope Street.

 

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Ostriches #7” by Kelly Conte remembers the 9-acre Cawston Ostrich Farm, the first ostrich farm in America with eighteen ostriches surviving the trip from South Africa, ultimately growing to a total of one hundred, which opened in 1886 and closed in 1935. Sponsors: Sheila Pautsch, Dr. Suzie Abajian, Waynna Kato, and Estelle Underwood.

Location: Southeast corner of El Centro Street at Fair Oaks Avenue, near the Starbucks.

 

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U. S. Route 66 was established in 1926 and officially removed from the United States Highway System in 1985. During it’s heyday, Route 66, which began in Chicago and ended in Santa Monica ( a total of 2,448 miles), was “a major path for those who migrated west, especially during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s” and “businesses along the route became prosperous due to the growing popularity of the highway.”¹

According to Historic66.com, the original alignment of Route 66 turned left from Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena and continued South on Fair Oaks Avenue, running through South Pasadena before turning right (west) on Huntington Boulevard.

Don Bloom commemorates this historic road with “Route 66 Forever” at the northwest corner of Monterey Road at Fremont Avenue. Sponsors: Morrow and Holman Plumbing, Inc.

 

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For complete details, please visit SoPasArtsCouncil.org.

For more box art—of wild parrots, picnics in the park, golden roses, and the metro—click the link: Hometown-Pasadena.com/Creative-types/utility-box-art.

 

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¹ Source: “U. S. Route 66,” Wikipedia.org.

 

 




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