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How living in an age of ‘peak TV’ is leading some to a binge burnout

Dec 11, 2018

 Nick Hehn shops for flat-panel wide screen televisions at a Best Buy store January 31, 2006 in Niles, Illinois.

Nick Hehn shops for flat-panel wide screen televisions at a Best Buy store January 31, 2006 in Niles, Illinois.; Credit: Tim Boyle/Getty Images

AirTalk®

In 2013, Netflix rolled out a new original series called “House of Cards” with an idea that might have seemed unorthodox at the time: make every episode from the show’s first season available for subscribers to watch immediately  as opposed to the traditional TV release model of releasing new episodes each week.

Today, it seems, binging has become the preferred way that many consume their TV. Why watch a show I have to wait a week for when I can choose one that has two seasons already out on Netflix that I can watch on my own time? But as technology continues to advance and new ways to deliver content to customers emerge, many of these streaming platforms are experimenting with new content delivery systems and models. And in the meantime, the rest of us are left to our own (streaming) devices as far as deciding what amongst Netflix or Hulu’s vast libraries we’re going to spend our valuable time watching.

At what point does the amount of TV available become too much? If you’re a subscriber to a major streaming or video-on-demand platform, has the glut of content had a chilling effect on your desire to watch a new show? How will technology continue to affect the ways streaming platform release content to services?

Guest:

Natalie Jarvey, digital media editor for The Hollywood Reporter; she tweets @natjarv

This content is from Southern California Public Radio. View the original story at SCPR.org.

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