Email

Japanese Gardens of Manzanar: Past, Present & Future

May 18, 2016

Manzanar_Relocation_Center,_Manzanar,_California._Evacuees_of_Japanese_ancestry_are_growing_flouris_._._._-_NARA_-_537981 (1)

As part of its East Asian Garden Lecture Series, the Huntington presents “Japanese Gardens of Manzanar: Past, Present, and Future.”

During World War II, the internment camp at Manzanar in the California desert held more than 10,000 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry. To ameliorate the harsh conditions, many of those imprisoned there built Japanese gardens.

Jeffery Burton, archaeologist at the Manzanar National Historic Site, examines the traces of these gardens, which were lost and abandoned when the site was closed. (Huntington.org)

This lecture is free and open to the public. No reservations are required.

 

Japanese Gardens of Manzanar: Past, Present, and Future
Tuesday, May 24th, 7:30 p.m.
The Huntington, Rothenberg Hall, 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino 91108
Free event
Huntington.org/calendar

 

Photo by Dorothea Lange, June 30, 1942. Public domain. Full caption reads: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. William Katsuki, former professional landscape gardener for large estates in Southern California, demonstrates his skill and ingenuity in creating from materials close at hand, a desert garden alongside his home in the barracks at this War Relocation Authority center.

Photo by Dorothea Lange, June 30, 1942. Public domain. Full caption reads: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. William Katsuki, former professional landscape gardener for large estates in Southern California, demonstrates his skill and ingenuity in creating from materials close at hand, a desert garden alongside his home in the barracks at this War Relocation Authority center.

 

Photo by Clem Albers, April 2, 1942. Wikimedia Commons. Full caption reads: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. So that gardens and farmers may follow their callings and to make it possible for evacuees to be self-supporting, (agriculture is a major pursuit at War Relocation Authority centers) here is a battery of spades for garden work.

By Clem Albers, Photographer (NARA record: 8452194) (U.S. National Archives and Records Administration) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons. Full caption reads: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. So that gardens and farmers may follow their callings and to make it possible for evacuees to be self-supporting, (agriculture is a major pursuit at War Relocation Authority centers) here is a battery of spades for garden work.

 

Photo, top right, (cropped) is by Dorothea Lange, dated July 2, 1942. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons. Full caption reads:

Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry are growing flourishing truck crops for their own use in their “hobby gardens”. These crops are grown in plots 10 x 50 feet between blocks of barrack at this War Relocation Authority center.

 

Full frame…

Manzanar_Relocation_Center,_Manzanar,_California._Evacuees_of_Japanese_ancestry_are_growing_flouris_._._._-_NARA_-_537981

 

Photo below, Manzanar garden, Block 34, by Daniel Mayer (mav) (Own work), via Wikimedia Commons…

Manzanar_-_Block_34_Garden

 

 




Discussion



Fiore

Flintridge Books

Lyd and Mo Photography

Louis Jane Studios

Homage Pasadena

Search