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Disaster Preparedness: Do You Have a Ham?

Jun 24, 2015

600px-Collins_706A-2Thanks to the Pasadena Radio Club (W6KA) for the following information

When the 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated parts of Nepal on April 25th, Amateur Radio provided communication for responders working in remote regions and served to help locate missing people and report casualties.

That spirit of public service is why members of the Pasadena Radio Club will participate in the national annual Amateur Radio Field Day exercise at Art Center—for 24 hours—from 11:00 a.m. PDT Saturday, June 27th to 11:00 a.m. on Sunday.

The objective? Contacting as many stations as possible.

Every year since 1933, ham radio operators across North America have established temporary ham radio stations in public locations during Field Day to showcase the science and skill of Amateur Radio. This event is open to the public and all are encouraged to attend.

 

Dr. Kate Hutton working a Morse code contact during a recent Pasadena Radio Club Field Day Event; photo courtesy of PRC

Dr. Kate Hutton working a Morse code contact during a recent Pasadena Radio Club Field Day Event; photo courtesy of PRC

 

“It’s easy for anyone to pick up a computer or smartphone, connect to the Internet and communicate,” says Tom Mikkelsen, president of the Pasadena Radio Club. “But if there’s an interruption of service or you’re out of range of a cell phone tower, you have no way to communicate. Ham radio functions completely independently of the Internet and cell phone infrastructure, can interface with tablets or smartphones, and can be set up almost anywhere in minutes.

“Hams can literally throw a wire in a tree for an antenna, connect it to a battery-powered transmitter and communicate halfway around the world. That’s why Amateur Radio is a huge asset to a community during a disaster if the standard communication infrastructure goes down.”

 

PRC Members Mary Bothwell and Tom Mikkelsen use a handheld antenna to work a amateur radio low earth satellite using a VHF/UHF handheld transceiver at one of the past Pasadena Radio Clubs Field Day Event; photo courtesy of PRC

PRC Members Mary Bothwell and Tom Mikkelsen use a handheld antenna to work a amateur radio low earth satellite using a VHF/UHF handheld transceiver at one of the past Pasadena Radio Club’s Field Day Event; photo courtesy of PRC

 

Field Day demonstrates ham radio’s ability to work reliably under any conditions, from almost any location and create an independent communications network. More than 45,000 people from thousands of U. S. locations participated in Field Day in 2014.

 

Amateur Radio Field Day Exercise
Saturday, June 27th, 11 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sunday, June 28th
Art Center College of Design, 1700 Lida Street, Pasadena
For complete info, visit PasadenaRadioClub.org

 

Field Day 2014: 10 Phone is on time; photo by Paul (N6LL)

Field Day 2014: 10 Phone is on time; photo by Paul (N6LL)

 

Example of a single (straight) key made for amateur radio…

575px-Single_straight_key_for_amateur_radio_maid_by_ham

 

450px-Part_of_dads_ham_radio_station

 

~~~

 

Photo, top right, ham radio by John Athayde from Washington, DC, USA (Collins 706A-2  Uploaded by shoulder-synth) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Photo, single straight key, by 櫻井貫大 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Photo, bottom, by Nate Steiner (Flickr: part of dad’s ham radio station) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons




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